Joey Votto Contract

Published: April 5, 2012

Joey Votto Contract, Joey Votto got a big payday by staying in a small market, agreeing to a $251.5 million, 12-year deal with the Cincinnati Reds on Wednesday that is the longest guaranteed contract in major league history.

The agreement adds $225 million over 10 years to his previous contract. The deal includes a club option for 2024, when the 2010 National League MVP turns 41.

After watching NL Central rivals St. Louis and Milwaukee lose their first basemen to bigger markets, the Reds secured Votto with a package that easily eclipsed Ken Griffey Jr.’s $116.5 million, nine-year deal from 2000 as the largest in franchise history. In the majors, it trails only Alex Rodriguez’s $275 million and $252 million deals, both over 10 years.

“Is it risky?” said owner Bob Castellini, who sought a lot of outside advice before signing off on the deal. “No doubt. That’s the environment we live in, especially as a small market. We feel Joe will be a cornerstone.”

It wasn’t an easy decision for the 28-year-old Votto to make such a long-term commitment. He decided he had found contentment in Cincinnati, which took him in the second round of the 2002 amateur draft.

“Maybe I could have found that elsewhere,” Votto said. “Maybe not. But I like what I’ve got here.”

Under Castellini, the Reds have been trying to rebuild the franchise into a regular winner by developing players and holding onto them. Six of their nine starters on opening day have come through the farm system.

Keeping Votto rather than letting him leave for a bigger market was considered a key.

“It’s hard to compete with the bigger markets,” manager Dusty Baker said before a workout at Great American Ball Park. “You see those guys who have left – they couldn’t come up with a deal – and they go to bigger markets like New York, L.A., Philadelphia, Chicago, Detroit, Anaheim.

“It means a lot not only for the franchise but also for the city. It means kids can grow up emulating him and pretending to be Joey Votto.”

Albert Pujols helped St. Louis win the World Series, then got a $240 million, 10-year deal from the Angels in December. Prince Fielder led Milwaukee to the division title, but left for a $214 million, nine-year contract with the Tigers.

The Reds have been trying to lock up the young core of their team for the past few years. Outfielder Jay Bruce received a six-year, $51 million deal after the 2010 season, when Cincinnati won the division but got swept in the playoffs by Philadelphia.

Votto was offered a long-term deal then as well, but chose a $38 million, three-year contract instead. He said he’s more willing to make a long-term commitment now, and joked his girlfriend probably was happy about that, too.

Votto gets base salaries of $9.5 million this year and $17 million in 2013 under his previous agreement. The new deal includes salaries of $12 million in 2014, $14 million in 2015, $20 million in 2016, $22 million in 2017 and $25 million in each of the following six seasons. The Reds have a $20 million option for 2024 with a $7 million buyout.

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